The Natural Method of Learning

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Section One. The Natural Method of Learning

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Chapter One. Cat Scientists

In this chapter, we discuss how Pavlov’s dogs and Thorndike’s cats defined the mainstream of psychology, neuroscience, and artificial intelligence for the Twentieth century and defied the discovery of the method of understanding.

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Chapter Two. Real Scientists

In this chapter, the man who invented quantum physics defines the way of thinking of the man who coined the theory of relativity. With some help from a prominent linguist and Aristotle, we are extending this definition to another way of learning.

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Chapter Three. Infant Scientists

In this chapter modern researchers in the area of child development provide experimental evidence supporting the genius insight of Max Planck about the motivation and the method of learning of the tiny scientists, human infants.

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Chapter Four. Savage Scientists

In this chapter, we will see how savage tribes before their close contact with modern humans as well as our prehistoric ancestors were using empiricism and logic to build and keep up to date their picture of the world — the gigantic foundation of modern science.

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Chapter Five. Objective Reality

In this Chapter, a physicist Max Plank and a psychologist Jean Piaget explain that the only objective reality accessible to us is a conceptual space created by the power of our intelligence.

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Curious about life and intelligence